Friday, July 07, 2006

Speling rite

In idiotic news, I read this story about making speling eser by speling wurdz like tha sound. Seriously, there's a whole Simplified Spelling Society composed of a lot of people who can't read so they want to punish the rest of us. Get JOBS folks! Maybe I'll do my 13 next week spelling words like this, and see if it would really be easier. ;)

10 comments:

Goofy Girl said...

I'd read it - but I think you would run the risk that if a publisher picked it up you'd have to take it off the web.

Janet (fondofsnape@gmail.com) said...

speling could be mistaken for speeling
eser = eeser or ehser
tha = does NOT sound like they...maybe thaa does, but I'd still want to use the flat a LOL!

but maybe it's just me ;-)

I would totally read a blook!

mar said...

Wait, it has taken me years to learn some English, pls don't change a thing, lol!

Melli said...

SOME people just have toooooooo much time on their hands! How about we re-invent the English language??? *rolls eyes*

Red said...

Aye, Mar, I'm with you!

Is it just me, or are we all regressing to minimum common denominator-style world here? It's messed up, man...

Chi said...

I visited the site & read it...I found it quite confusing, to be honest...it is like a whole new language to me. *s*

Renee said...

Us homeschooling moms had a hard time reading that or stomaching it either. It's way too late to change the spelling of everything.

Killired said...

i just might have to send that article to my phonics professor... i took phonics last semester and english is the very difficult to learn because there are 26 letters in the alphabet but 44 distinct sounds... since there is not a 1-to-1 correspondance with sounds to letters, our language is hard. i learned a lot in the class... very eye opening... but i can't see changing the way we spell.. it makes sense but would be way to confusing to change to something like that.

Great Day said...

heck, I could barely read that and I have always excelled in english and literature.

My one big question is this? how would we know what form of know (no) was being used. What about there (their, they're) the spelling can change the whole meaning of what your reading.

Besides, like the rest of you, I'm just getting the hang of all of this.

* (asterisk) said...

In England in the 70s we had a very similar learning programme, called something like IPA - three initials, anyway. I'm not sure that it really took off. It was pretty much phased out by the time I was learning to read, but there were still a few of the books kicking around in the cupboards.

As a gifted reader (what can I say?!), I was given the choice of whatever books I could find in the class, so I opted to read some of these oddities. It was legible, sure, but... why?

Yes, language changes, spellings change - compare Shakespeare with modern English; Dante with modern Italian - but why make a concerted effort to make things easier for the minority? Language should develop to make it more flexible, more able to express yet more things, not just to make it easier. Sheesh!